From Nazi-Occupied Denmark to the Labs of 4 Nobel Laureates

Written by Justine Rothbart

__

Following up on Katie Rodda’s post about discoveries, I wanted to share another discovery I made in the American Association of University Women’s (AAUW) Archives. As I was processing the AAUW Fellowship Files, I came across the amazing story of Hilde Levi’s escape from the Nazis and three letters written by Nobel Prize-winning scientists:  Niels BohrGeorge de Hevesy, and James Franck. Just as Katie mentioned in her blog post, these letters could have easily been overlooked. If it wasn’t for remembering the Bohr model of the atom from my high school chemistry class, this discovery would have not been made!

Nobel laureate Neils Bohr’s letter I discovered in the AAUW Archives

Click here to read my blog post about this discovery in the AAUW Archives.

Advertisements

Jonas Salk, Polio Vaccine Inventor, Wrote Us a Letter

Written by Justine Rothbart

_____

Jonas Salk

It’s never a dull day in the AAUW archives. I never know what treasure I am going to find in our fellowship files. Each fellow is unique. Each one has their own story. In Helen Claudia Henry’s 1955–56 International Fellowship file, I came across two letters written by Jonas Salk, the virologist who discovered the polio vaccine. As I held the letters in my hands, I could not believe that letters from a world-famous scientist are here in the AAUW archives.

As I dug deeper, the story of the letters began to take shape.

Click here to read the full story about this new discovery in the AAUW Archives.

“Oh my gosh, this is so cool!”

Written by Justine Rothbart

__

“Oh my gosh, this is so cool!” This phrase goes through my head dozens of times a day while working in the archives. As archivists, we think almost everything in an archival collection is the most interesting thing in the world. Well, of course, we’re archivists. We get lost in our own world reading the stories, examining historic photos, and listening to oral histories. We think, “I have to tell everyone about this! They will all think it is so interesting!” Will they? Let’s think for a minute. Let’s think about those people who are not archivists. Let’s think about those who do not dedicate their life to preserving and providing access to archival material. Will they feel the same way you do? Will they care as much as you do?

Click here to continue reading the rest of the post on the Society of American Archivists Issues and Advocacy Roundtable blog.

“We’ve had news of an accident”

Written by Justine Rothbart

__

AAUW member Judge Sarah Hughes (left) swears in Lyndon B. Johnson as Jackie Kennedy and others watch. November 22, 1963. (Image by Cecil Stoughton, White House Photo Office. Courtesy of LBJ Presidential Library, Austin)

AAUW member Judge Sarah Hughes (left) swears in Lyndon B. Johnson as Jackie Kennedy and others watch. November 22, 1963. (Image by Cecil Stoughton, White House Photo Office. Courtesy of LBJ Presidential Library, Austin)

Fifty years later, we remember the tragic day of November 22, 1963. As the American Association of University Women (AAUW) Archives Intern, I looked back through oral histories to find the story of one person who was not only a witness, but a key figure in history on November 22, 1963: Judge Sarah T. Hughes.

Click here to read the full story of Judge Sarah T. Hughes.