CUA CHIM Forum Update: Call-For-Posters Submission Deadline Extended

The Department of Library and Information Science at the Catholic University of America will be hosting the Cultural Heritage Information Management Forum on June 5, 2015.  This year’s Forum will include a poster session.  Call-For-Posters: Cultural Heritage Information Management Forum at the Catholic University of America, posted on January 31, 2015, outlined the specifications for submitting poster proposals to the Forum Planning Committee.

Since the original press release, the CHIM Forum Planning Committee has elected to officially extend the poster proposal submission deadline to March 15, 2015.  All subsequent call-for-posters announcements and related information releases will reflect this change.  All other “important dates” related to the Forum and call-for-posters remain the same, including the March 23, 2015 notification of proposal acceptance.


For more detailed information on submitting a proposal, please refer to the original blog post.  Those seeking further details about the CHIM Forum itself may refer to the event website.

As always, questions and concerns can be answered by contacting the CHIM Forum Planning Committee.


Important Changes:  Deadline for poster proposal submissions has been changed from March 2, 2015 to March 15, 2015.

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Check Out the Upcoming 7th Annual “Bridging the Spectrum Symposium”

No matter what sector of librarianship you happen to be in, you’re sure to gain valuable knowledge and useful insights at this year’s annual “Bridging the Spectrum” Symposium! The Symposium is coming up on Friday, February 20, so register now for:

  • Keynote speaker Superintendent of Documents Mary Alice Baish’s update on the changes underway at the recently renamed Government Publications Office, and the future of government information.
  • Panelists and speakers sharing experiences and insights from across the spectrum of librarianship, from School Library Media to Law Librarianship and more.
  • Lunch and poster sessions that provide opportunities to catch up with old friends and make unexpected new connections.

As the National Capital region’s only regional symposium featuring diverse contributions from your local colleagues, and at an incredibly affordable $25, this is a “don’t miss” event!

For more information, visit the Symposium’s homepage. To register now, please visit the event registration portal.


CUA Library and Information Science students are eligible to have their registration fee supported by AGLISS!  Simply register for the Symposium, using this form, by Friday, February the 6th, and you will be registered for free, courtesy of AGLISS.

Once you’ve requested the registration fee waiver, AGLISS will verify your current enrollment as a CUA LIS student and send you a confirmation message.

Call-for-Posters: Cultural Heritage Information Management Forum at the Catholic University of America

The Department of Library and Information Science at the Catholic University of America is pleased to announce that the June 5, 2015 Cultural Heritage Information Management Forum will host a poster session.  The session is designed to showcase research and projects related to the Forum’s theme: Cultural Heritage Collections: Content and Access in the Digital Era. We welcome poster proposals concerning topics related to this theme.  Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Infrastructure for collection sharing, research, and access
  • Creation of digital collections
  • Access to digital cultural heritage collections
  • Outreach and engagement of users
  • Stewardship of cultural heritage collections
  • Partnerships and collaboration
  • Sustainability and funding models

The posters for the CHIM Forum are refereed. Poster presenters will participate in the lightning talk and have time to discuss their posters with fellow Forum participants over lunch.  Presenters will have many opportunities to interact with the audience and receive feedback on their projects.

Since space for poster display is limited, please submit your poster proposals by the deadline, March 2, 2015.

For further information about the CHIM Forum please visit the event website. The site will be updated as new details become available.

Instructions for Poster Proposals Submission

In a Word document, please include:

Name and contact information:

  • Full name of presenter(s)
  • Contact information (phone number and email address)
  • Institutional affiliation
  • Academic status and/or job title

Poster description:

  • Poster title
  • Poster abstract (50 words, for Forum program)
  • Poster description (maximum of 200 words)

Please email your poster proposal to the Planning Committee at cua-chim-forum@cua.edu by Monday, March 2, 2015. Your poster proposal submission will be acknowledged within 24 hours after submission. Notification of acceptance will be sent on March 23.  Poster presenters are responsible for printing the posters and mounting them for display at the CHIM Forum. Poster presenters must register for the CHIM Forum. Registration is free and includes lunch.  You will be alerted when registration opens.

Important Dates

  • Proposal submission deadline:  Monday, March 2, 2015
  • Notification of acceptance: Monday, March 23, 2015

Questions?

Please contact the Planning Committee at cua-chim-forum@cua.edu if you have any questions about submitting a poster proposal.

Thank you!

Yellowstone Archives Blitz: Five People, One Week, and a Huge Success

Written by Justine Rothbart

Yellowstone Archives Blitz Team 1 (September 2014): (left to right) Patricia Lehar, Anna Trammell, Erin Bostwick, Anne Foster, Shawn Bawden, Henry Mac, and Justine Rothbart (me).

Yellowstone Archives Blitz Team 1 (September 2014): (left to right) Patricia Lehar, Anna Trammell, Erin Bostwick, Anne Foster, Shawn Bawden, Henry Mac, and Justine Rothbart (me).

 

As I skimmed through my e-mails, this one caught my eye: “Yellowstone National Park is seeking five graduate students (or recent graduates) to volunteer in the park’s archives for five days.” As I’m sitting at my desk at the National Park Service Washington Office (WASO) in Washington, D.C., I imagine myself hiking through the first national park. Maybe I would actually see wildlife in person, instead of just from a “live cam” on my computer. Maybe I would see a part of the country I have never seen before. And most of all, maybe this position will give me experience to work on an innovative project in my field of study: Archives.

Continue reading this blog post on the Yellowstone National Park’s blog: In the Shadow of the Arch.

“Archives Blitz” in Yellowstone!

Written by Justine Rothbart

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In two weeks I will be embarking on my trip to Yellowstone National Park. You might ask, “How is your trip to Yellowstone related to Cultural Heritage Information Management?” Well, this is no ordinary trip. I was selected as one of five archivists to go to Yellowstone National Park to find their hidden collections. (In other words, I’ll be the Indiana Jones of archives.) Our team of five will spend one week in Yellowstone to complete an “Archives Blitz.”

Here’s a picture of what we’ll look like during our week in Yellowstone:

Tourists at Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, 1888

Tourists at Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, 1888

The Yellowstone Archives designed this one-week “blitz” to help small and rural repositories, like theirs, to process their collection. Here’s a blog post that describes the project: Using a Team Approach to Expose Yellowstone’s Hidden Collection.

I am very excited to be a part of this unique project. As a current National Park Service Intern, I am looking forward to learn more about a National Park’s archival collection located outside the Washington, D.C. area. By traveling to Yellowstone National Park, this will give me the opportunity to reflect on my past experience and give context to the archival profession as a whole.

Can’t wait to see what we discover!

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Check back for a future blog post(s) about my Yellowstone “Archives Blitz” experience.

Geeking Out

Written by Justine Rothbart

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geek out

  1. To enthuse about a specific topic, not realizing that most people listening will fail to understand it.
  2. To do geeky things; to act geeky; to speak of geeky things. [wiktionary]

 

How many times has this happened to you? You might be talking about something totally cool, and then suddenly realize that others are not as excited. They might be nodding their heads along thinking, “Wow, I’m glad she’s excited” or maybe “When is she going to stop talking?”

If you know me, you might have listened to me totally geek out about something. It might have been about archives, historic preservation, cats…ok, I’ll stop there. Anyways, there’s always something that gets people excited. And isn’t it surprising when it’s not the same thing you’re interested in?

This Saturday I saw the wide range of things people could geek out about. Thousands of book lovers gathered at the Washington, D.C Convention Center for the 14th annual Library of Congress National Book Festival. I listened to Sandra Day O’Connor and her brother talk about wild horses in the west, Eric Cline talk about archaeology and the year civilization collapsed, and Elizabeth Mitchell talk about the sculptor of the Statue of Liberty. While I was totally excited to learn about the diary of the Statue of Liberty’s sculptor, others were having just as good of a time learning about graphic novels or poetry in other sessions.

It’s sometimes refreshing to get out of your comfort zone. You might, like me, gravitate to the things you know you’ll be interested in. But if you try something new, you might step into another world that you didn’t even know existed. And who knows, you might even enjoy it.

This happened to me on Saturday while I was waiting in line with my friend to meet David Sibley. As my friend described him, David Sibley is the “rock star of the bird world.” While I like birds, I am not a bird enthusiast. I was there for my friend. I never knew how much someone could like birds until we met the other people in line. Suddenly I was on the other side of geeking out. I was the one just smiling and nodding along. Although I wasn’t as excited as they were, it gave me a greater appreciation for bird watching. I was happy to see people so passionate about one subject.

I was glad I stood in that line to see that other world, that new perspective. I don’t think I’ll be buying a pair of binoculars anytime soon. But now when I see a bird, I’ll stop and take a few more seconds to think back to David Sibley and the bird enthusiasts we met in line at the National Book Festival.

 

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Check out my blog post from last year’s National Book Festival: Cupcakes are out. Archives are in.